STATEMENT

I am not a digital native. I was born in 1982, the cusp of millenial-hood. I remember a world before the internet, before virtual reality, video game culture, and internet TV. I have seen the world change dramatically. I was raised on a steady diet of Turner Classic Movies on TV, science fiction, and daily wanderings in the forest. The source of my visual language is deeply mired in these influences. My work aims to reconcile the image consumption modes of my youth with those of the present. Currently, the digital realms of VR, video games, and photoshopped imagery have taken hold of my aesthetic vision. The world we live in is not limited to the IRL. Instead, it is an amalgam of images from lived experience and a digital interface. My work hopes to imbue a simultaneous embrace and rebuttal of the digital. I create, through a painstaking and methodical mark-making process, works that reference the digital worlds, yet are born from a deep well of personal experience in relation to landscape and architecture. Using drawing as a dominant mode of exploration I seek to address the digital through the hand-made.
I am fascinated by landscape and our human approximation of the natural world. We are constantly trying to recreate what we see around us, and ,sometimes foolishly, improve upon it. My vision is inspired by these interpretations of the world around us. Specifically, I look to the exaggerated intensity of video game scenery, the fantastical architecture of casinos, resorts, and cruise ships, the imagined worlds of science fiction, the whimsical stage sets of classic movies, and the idealized landscapes of classical painting. My work plays on the imaginary, yet is full of tension and critique. I aim to create spaces that are alluring, yet discomfiting.
I primarily use prismacolor markers to create my drawings. I have developed a mark-making technique that is reminiscent of a pixelated image, yet is entirely hand-made. These works take a very long time. Some say I could make similar work digitally in half the time, but for me the point is the drawing. The process of mark-marking is critical to the development of the image. The physical interaction is vital for me. It is in this process that I am able to refute the complete subjugation of the creative by the digital.